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tv   BOS Public Safety Committee 12116  SFGTV  January 24, 2016 11:15pm-12:01am PST

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some people will say, a department to solve homlessness mayor. 93 eve. we can't solve homelessness in san francisco. i know that will will be peoples comments. i say we will end homelessness every every single day for @ least one person. for at least one family. for at least a veteran every single day. i know because i have felt the power of giving keys to people exactly in those situations. we will end it for every 1 for every day for someone who suffers on our street. that is what the purpose of creating this department is about. i want a staff at this new department, each person on the staff will come
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to work every morning with a single minded focus on ending homelessness for people on the streets. i want the measure of the work of this department and my office to be answering this question, what did i do to end homelessness on our city streets today and what did i do to give people a stable shelter, a home and a path to a healthier life. that is what i want them to ask themselves every single day. i want that to be the question that they ask of themselves. you know, ending homelessness in a very simple way is a matter of priorities. to get there we have to double down on programs that truly work. we have to coordinate with partners, federal, state and other cities. we have to share and do the best practices and we have to also share our challenges with
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each other. and you know, i always am focused and concerned about congress and as you know, congress is largely abandoned homelessness in the country and we in san francisco can't wait frathe politics of waug wash dc to arrive, we have tolead and we lead with values. our san francisco values. that is what being a san franciscan is all about, isn't it? it is our values. to be fully able to achieve this vision i'm inviting a group of national experts to advise how to create and set the mandate for this new department. i have spoken to president obamas point person on homelessness, matthew dorty and he agreed to come out and advise and has the expertise of
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looking at programs across the country to see what works. we want to be egressive on this but want to be practical at the same time. how will we define sausking street homelessness? what are the investments we are making and how can we double down on this? is there something that we can be doing that we are not already doing? i aults want to invite the local homeless coordinating board to serve as a formal advisory body during the process. we convened san franciscos best and brightest on that commission and definitely need your input. i invite all of you here, every one of you, the people working hard every day day in and out to join in defining the new effort as well because i'll present this plan with the budget this coming year. foremost among the efforts of the department are
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expanding the successful navigation center program. we learned that by removing barrier tooz entry into the shelter program and pairing ever navigation center with a housing exist we are making a difference. we already committed the funding in the budget this year to double our capacity at the navigation center and the department will significantly increase to this model. we'll coordinate outreach and build more centers and secure more housing exists. certainly this requires serious funding. since i took office we have spent all most 100 mil yen more every year on homeless services and housing and my commitment today is this, to never let our city slip backwards on our funding priorities. that means
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movering forward we'll spend at threes 250 million a year on outreach and housing for 10s of thousands of people. we know success isn't mesered by how much money we spend, you know that. accountability matters. we are measured by the number of human beings we lep off our streets and into a better life and by conditions on our streets also improving at the same time. so, i'm setting a ambishish but i believe an achievable goal for the second term. by the time i leave office we will move at least 8 thousand people out of homelessness and we'll remove them out of homelessness forever. [applause] and we'll build a system that ends a persons
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homelessness before it becomes chronic. that is another thing we learned from the navigation center and we'll do this and achieve this all together. we'll do this by housing families, veterans long term homeless to homeward bound program and long term care for the seriously mentally ill. i also need cooperation for the private sector and philanthropic partner tooz participate as well. i already started conversation with san francisco's business leaders on this particular goal. business leaders, big and small, about a multi-year partnership to add additional navigation centers to the cities portfolio. to them across the board i say thank you and begin by saying a personal thank you to our first anonymous private donor to the
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the first navigation center. i'm excited for our partnerships to develop more in the coming months just like the way we started our first navigation center. it was a partnership with faith and funding sources and community in the mission and then everybody else. we need more partnership models like our effort to end family homelessness in the elementary schools which is the focus of [inaudible] 2 great civic leaders. no less different than our technology leaders like nob nub who also became a partner to end veterans homelessness by funding a viable new housing for them in mission bay. letting people live on our streets exposed to violence and whether that isn't compassion. it isn't
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healthy, it isn't safe and it does want represent who we are as san francisco and it is not our san francisco values. you know, i'm also proud of our city coming together over something that used to be controversial and i'm talking about lauras law. thank you for visor marc farrell, thank you for your leadership in this effort on a issue that used to divide a lot of us, now it units us with a comma causs because we are figuring it out. since we launched our consensus program just last month we have already received 28 referals from ern concerned family members and service providers. some of the most severely mentally ill they are finally
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getting help. laura's law is one the many compassionate programs we should be doing in partnership with our courts and district attorney and justice system. san francisco values means we won't lock people up or persecute them just for being mentally ill. that won't happen and won't happen as long as i'm mayor, but we can use the resources our justice system to make sure people are getting better heltier outcomes. i want to challenge the courts, our public defender and district attorney and health provider tooz come together in the same spirit of collaboration that i proposed today. coming together with your diverse responsibilities and your legal mandates to better serve those desperately in need of our help because i will challenge you with the same outcome i'm calling upon
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everyone else. let's talk about not just our legal mandates, lets also talk about outcomes for people. [applause] it is not compassionate and you will agree with me on this to let people suffer silently, to medicate with drugs and call and live an unhealthy life on our streets, that is not compassion and we are empowered to help the seriously mentally ill people but first have to agree to coperate. in a new year i'll invite all our gurchlt stakeholders and mental health and criminal justice to convene with me. i bring this group together to get past the reasons we cannot do things and figure out a way we can do it. let's say for example, you take this program, some of you in the room know
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what the 51/50 program is. it is a program with people in personal crisis and danger to themselves we take them to the hospital for 72 hours, but you know what is the challenging part of that 51/50 program? once they come out they go right back on the streets and into the same unhealthy situation that they were literally 48 hours ago. we pulled them out and bring them right back in. that is 51/50. let's redesignthality program for a better outcome, a sustained outcome for those individuals. let's redesign conservativeship programs to serve the intended populations while respecting their civil liberty. we can have a better outcome on that as well. the seriously mentally ill deserve
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our best efforts. it is complicated and that's why we take that challenge up. as we focus on getting people into healthier settings, we also need to refocus on the people who are not homeless. the people who prey on our homeless. drug dealers who target the addicted and mentally ill contributing to serious health problems. i'm calling y i am calling for stepped up enforcement for predatory drug dealing around our navigation centers and shelter and homeless service locations and every place we house our homeless. [applause] we need to clean up drug dealing around the buildings where homeless people are trying to clean up
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their lives. we are not criminalizing drug addictions, we are enforcing existing laws to protect the most vulnerable. i want to thank supervisor and president of the board of supervisors president london breed for being a leader on the reforms. she is a strong voice the quality of life and reforming our treatment of the mentally ill. that's why friend i am optimistic. a new department, ambitious goal, a will in our city to succeed on this. we can make homelessness rare. we can make it brief. we can make it a one time event in peoples lives. we can move at least 8 thousand people out of homelessness forever. for too long deeply held and ideological differences divided all of
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us. some say we are not tough enough. others say we are not compalgzinate enough. some say we spend too much money and others say we haven't spent enough. it is time to reconcile these disagroogruments not to set them aside but work through them. if we can cooperate to solve homelessness the sky is the limit on what else we can achieve together. i want to say to you again, we can end homelessness for each individual that we touch, for each family, for each child, we can do that for them. that's what we can define as ending homelessness. if we do it together, we will have demonstrated that collaboration and cooperation is the best way to move forward. so, i want to end by saying thank you to all of you for taking time out of
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your busy day to listen to me. i'm excited to work with you, this will give a struck chur to work effectively with all of us. we can do better and will do better, i'm excited and we are san francisco. thank you very much. [applause] food in san francisc just about expensive eat but food for everyone and there's organizations in the city that are doing really good work
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making sure that healthy food it assessable to everyone. more and more as follows are are becoming interested in upper arlthd they want to joy the open green pace sea know where their food it coming from we'll look at 3 programs talking ushering agricultural and garden to new heights. so what exactly it, your honor agricultural >> it the growing food or flowers within city limits traditionally we've been referring to communities gardener that is a raised bed over and over upper argument has a more a farming way of farming.
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>> so tell me 0 what's growing in this garden. >> a really at all plant. in the one of the rare places, you know, people have access to green space 24 is one of the places to grow things like the purple floor. it is sort of recognizing that the more diversity in given space the better not to just have one thing by everything supported each another >> it provides the community with an opportunity to get their hands dirty and reach 0 out and congressmen with the community in ways they might have not otherwise to engage with one
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other. >> now the dpw urban planning program so see how the garden community. >> so i grew up on a farm in air force base we picked the foods open the trees and share with other families and as i drive around san francisco i see any trees with apples or mrumdz and lemon trees i can see the food going to waste and brought that idea back to the department many of the trees where the fruit would go to waste we origin or crop and pick other fruits and delivery this to food banks or shelters to people who need them. >> i'm here with nang wong hello nang. >> hello. >> i need to understand house
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this gleaning work. >> we come and harvest like for example, we'll come over here this is the lemon and plug it like this. >> (laughter). >> made that good, good and ease. >> the trick is how not to hurt the branches. >> like the thing. >> i'm so excited about this. the people are so passionate about where the food goes to the private property owners give us the food they're happy that no of a t is going to waste >> oh. thank you. thank you.
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again job aura natural >> (laughter). >> from backyards to back lots let's take a look at the food and community bonding at the free farm. >> my idea was to start growing food and giving it away. and getting my neighbors to who had space and having a kind of event that brings people together not to run our food program this time around but to share the wealth of the abundance of our welfare. we were all divorce and as part of our philosophy of working together and working together. >> what's the most rewarding aspect of volunteering for the free farm stand. >> well, we could is a
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generalic satisfaction but something about giving food away it's giving something i brought that in and sort it and gave it to you it's primitive to be able to give something some basically to someone else. >> now serving number to 49 come on down. >> we have the capability of producing this food and in san francisco you can grow food all year round so the idea we're capable of prougdz food in our own backyards we're here to demonstrate an bans of food and i think that giving it away for free we show individuals it in have to be a comedy. >> we build time together and
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it's the strength of any ideas of the connections we'll turn that connection and the more connections you make no mistake about it the more you can have a stronger power and not have to rely on money that's the people power. >> in this episode we've seen the urban farms and gardens provide more in fruits and vegetation people can have the special produce available it can be a place to give back by donating food to others and teach our children the connection to the earth and
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environment it's truly welcome did you know that many buildings in san francisco are not bolted to the foundation on today's episode we'll learn how the option to bolt our foundation in an earthquake. >> hi, everybody welcome to another episode of stay safe i'm the director of earthquake safety in the city and county of san francisco i'm joined by a friend matt. >> thank you thanks for being with us we're in a garage but at the el cap center south of market in san francisco what we've done a simulated the garage to show you what it is
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like to make the improvements and reduce the reflexes of earthquake we're looking at foundation bolts what do they do. >> the foundation bolts are one of the strengthening system they hold the lowest piece of wood onto the foundation that prevents the allows from sliding during an earthquake that is a bolt over the original construction and these are typically put in along the foundation to secure the house to the foundation one of the things we'll show you many types of bolts let's go outside and show the vufrdz we're outside the epic center in downtown san francisco we'll show 3 different types of bolts we have a e poxy
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anchor. >> it is a type of anchor that is adhesive and this is a rod we'll embed both the awe hey that embeds it into the foundation that will flip over a big square washer so it secured the mud sell to the foundation we'll need to big drill luckily we have peter from the company that will help us drill the first hole. >> so, now we have the hole drilled i'll stick the bolt in and e post-office box it. >> that wouldn't be a bad idea but the dust will prevent the e post-office box from bonding we need to clean the hole out first. >> so, now we have properly
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cleaned hole what's the next step. >> the next step to use e post-office box 2 consultants that mixes this together and get them into tubes and put a notice he will into the hole and put the e post-office box slowly and have a hole with e post-office box. >> now it is important to worm or remember when you bolt our own foundation you have to go to 9 department of building inspection and get a permit before you start what should we look at next what i did next bolt. >> a couple of anchors that expand and we can try to next that will take a hole that hole is drilled slightly larger marathon the anchor size for the e post-office box to flow around
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the anchor and at expansion is going into the hole the same dinning room we'll switch tamet so, now we have the second hole drilled what next. >> this is the anchor and this one has hard and steel threads that cuts their way into the concrete it is a ti ton anchor with the same large square so similar this didn't require e post-office box. >> that's correct you don't needed for the e post-office box
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to adhere overnight it will stick more easily. >> and so, now it is good to go is that it. >> that's it. >> the third anchor is a universal foundation plate when you don't have room above our foundation to drill from the
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top. >> so, now we have our foundation plate and the tightened screw a couple of ways to take care of a foundation what's the best. >> the best one depends on what your house is like and our contractors experience they're sometimes considered the cadillac anchor and triplely instead of not witting for the e post-office box this is essentially to use when you don't have the overhead for the foundation it really depends on the contractor and engineering what they prefer. >> talking to a qualified professional and see what
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>> i'm your host of "culturewire," and today, here at electric works in san francisco. nice to see you today. thanks for inviting us in and showing us your amazing facility today. >> my pleasure. >> how long has electric works been around?
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>> electric works has been in san francisco since the beginning of 2007. we moved here from brisbane from our old innovation. we do printmaking, gallery shows, and we have a fabulous retail store where there are lots of fun things to find. >> we will look at all of that as we walk around. it is incredible to me how many different things you do. how is it you identify that san francisco was in need of all these different services? >> it came from stepping out of graduate school in 1972. i wrote a little thing about how this is an idea, how our world should work. it should have printmaking, archiving, a gallery. it should have a retail store. in 1972, i wanted to have art sales, point-of-sale at the grocery store. >> so you go through the manifesto.
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with the bay area should have. you are making art incredibly accessible in so many different ways, so that is a good segue. let's take a walk around the facilities. here we are in your gallery space. can you tell me about the current show? >> the current show is jeff chadsey. he is working on mylar velum, a smooth, beautiful drawing surface. i do not know anyone that draws as well as he does. it is perfect, following the contours and making the shape of the body. >> your gallery represents artists from all over, not just the bay area, an artist that work in a lot of different media. how to use some of what you look for in artists you represent? >> it is dependent on people are confident with their materials. that is a really important thing. there is enough stuff in the
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world already. >> you also have in his current show an artist who makes sculpture out of some really interesting types of materials. let's go over and take a look at that. here we are in a smaller space. project gallery. >> artists used the parameters of this space to find relationships between the work that is not out in the big gallery. >> i noticed a lot of artists doing really site-specific work. >> this is a pile of balloons, something that is so familiar, like a child's balloon. in this proportion, suddenly, it becomes something out of a dream. >> or a nightmare. >> may be a nightmare. >> this one over here is even harder to figure out what the initial material is. >> this is made out of puffy paint. often, kids use it to decorate their clothes.
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she has made all these lines of paint. >> for the pieces we are looking at, is there a core of foam or something in the middle of these pieces that she built on top of? >> i'm not telling. >> ah, a secret. >> this silver is aluminum foil, crumbled of aluminum foil. her aesthetic is very much that quiet, japanese spatial thing that i really admire. their attention to the materiality of the things of the world. >> this is a nice juxtaposition you have going on right now. you have a more established artists alongside and emerging artists. is that something important to you as well? >> very important in this space, to have artists who really have not shown much. now let's look at other aspects of electric works operation. let's go to the bookstore.
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>> ok. >> in all seriousness, here we are in your store. this is the first space you encounter when you come in off the street. it has evolved since you open here into the most amazingly curious selection of things. >> this was the project for the berkeley art museum. it was -- this is from william wiley's retrospective, when he got up onstage to sing a song, 270 people put on the cat. >> it is not just a bookstore. it is a store. can you talk us through some of your favorites? >> these are made in china, but they are made out of cattails. >> these pieces of here, you have a whale head and various animals and their health over there, and they are jewelry. >> we do fund raisers for
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nonprofits, so we are doing a project for the magic theater, so there are some pretty funny cartoons. they are probably not for prime time. >> you sort of have a kind of holistic relationship where you might do merchandise in the store that promotes their work and practice, and also, prince for them. maybe we should go back and look at the print operation now. >> let's go. >> before we go into the print shop, i noticed some incredible items you have talked back here. what are we standing in front of? >> this is william wiley, only one earth. this is a print edition. there are only eight total, and what we wanted to do was expand the idea of printmaking.
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this is really an art object. there we go. >> besides the punball machine, what do you produce in limited edition? >> there is the slot machine. if you win the super jackpot, you have saved the world. >> what about work? >> the right design, it was three volumes with lithographs in each volume. the cab of count dracula with 20 lithographs inside and lined with beaver fur. really special. >> let's move on to the print shop. >> ok. the core of what we do is making things. this is an example. this is a print project that will be a fund-raiser for the contemporary music players. we decided to put it in the
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portfolio so you could either frame at or have it on your bookshelf. >> so nonprofits can come to you, not just visual are nonprofits, but just nonprofits can come to you, and you will produce prints for them to sell, and the profits, they can keep. >> the return on investment is usually four times to 10 times the amount of investment. this is for the bio reserve in mexico, and this is one of the artists we represent. >> you also make prints for the artists that you represent. over here are some large prints by a phenomenal artist. >> he writes these beautiful things. anyone who has told you paradise is a book of rules is -- has only appeared through the windows. this is from all over coffee. we are contract printers for all
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kinds of organizations all across the country. >> thank you very much for showing us around today. i really appreciate you taking the time to let me get better acquainted with the operation and also to share with our "culturewire" team.
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>> good morning, everyone. welcome to our new eating spot in city hall. let's continue our tradition start the meeting with the pledge of allegiance. >>[pleage of allegiance] >> this is the reminder that under administrative code section 67 the use of cell phones and pagers and similar sound producing electric devices is prohibited during mission meetings.

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